Wild Dublin

Exploring Nature in the City

Wild Dublin

New in Paperback Above buildings, beneath rivers and canals, amidst bushes and trees ... inside the M50 nature abounds. A lavish, entertaining and uniquely visual nature book. Exciting to read, up to date and comprehensive in its information. Minks in the Dodder, whales on the coastline, bats in Raheny, newts in Dundrum, badgers in Rathfarnham, otters in Ringsend - these are just some of the fantastic creatures to be seen in the capital. Éanna's intriguing running commentary both entertains and explains, and this is a book for the entire family. Contains exclusive new photographs by Anthony Woods and specially commissioned watercolours by David Daly. A truly stunning book, full of fascinating facts and beautiful photos, showing a city we thought we knew in a new light.

Dublin

Notebook

Dublin

Stylish Designer Journal / Notebook. Interior 150 lined pages. Size 6"x 9". Glossy softcover. Perfect for everyday use. Perfectly spaced between lines to allow plenty of room to write. Wild Pages Press are publishers of unique journals, school exercise books, college or university lecture pads, memo books, notebooks, journals and travel journals that are a little bit quirky and different. Stunning covers, sturdy for everyday use. Great quality, we offer thousands, upon thousands of different designs to choose from. Our quality products make amazing gifts perfect for any special occasion or for a bit of luxury for everyday use. Our products are so versatile, they come in a wide range, be it the perfect travel companion, or a stylish lecture pad for college or university, cool composition and school exercise books for school, comprehensive notebook for work, or as a journal, the perfect family heirloom to be treasured for years to come. Competitively priced so they can be enjoyed by everyone.

Lonely Planet Pocket Dublin

Lonely Planet Pocket Dublin

Lonely Planet's Pocket Dublin is your most up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Stroll through the cobbled squares of Trinity College, savour a pint at the Guinness Storehouse, and explore Dublin Castle- all with your trusted travel companion.

Ireland's Wild Atlantic Way

A Guide to its Historic Treasures

Ireland's Wild Atlantic Way

Boasting ancient tombs, atmospheric castles and sacred retreats, the Wild Atlantic Way is alive with treasures to explore. Beginning in Kinsale, Neil Jackman guides us northwards to visit his top 100 heritage sites. From 350-million-year-old footprints on Valentia Island to vestiges of the more recent past like the cottage of 1916 revolutionary Patrick Pearse, you will discover the stories behind the dramatic scenery. Here is everything you need to know about the history of iconic landscapes like the Cliffs of Moher and the Ring of Kerry, as well as lesser-known delights like the monastic site at Reask in County Kerry and the Doonfeeny Standing Stone in County Mayo. For those who want to get off the beaten track, there are trips to islands like Scattery, Inishmurray and, of course, the breathtaking Skellig Michael. This engaging and practical guide is an essential companion for any explorer wishing to dig deeper and discover the gems of this spectacular landscape.

The Templars, the Witch, and the Wild Irish

Vengeance and Heresy in Medieval Ireland

The Templars, the Witch, and the Wild Irish

Early medieval Ireland is remembered as the "Land of Saints and Scholars," due to the distinctive devotion to Christian faith and learning that permeated its culture. As early as the seventh century, however, questions were raised about Irish orthodoxy, primarily concerning Easter observances. Yet heresy trials did not occur in Ireland until significantly later, long after allegations of Irish apostasy from Christianity had sanctioned the English invasion of Ireland. In The Templars, the Witch, and the Wild Irish, Maeve Brigid Callan analyzes Ireland’s medieval heresy trials, which all occurred in the volatile fourteenth century. These include the celebrated case of Alice Kyteler and her associates, prosecuted by Richard de Ledrede, bishop of Ossory, in 1324. This trial marks the dawn of the "devil-worshipping witch" in European prosecutions, with Ireland an unexpected birthplace. Callan divides Ireland’s heresy trials into three categories. In the first stand those of the Templars and Philip de Braybrook, whose trial derived from the Templars’, brought by their inquisitor against an old rival. Ledrede’s prosecutions, against Kyteler and other prominent Anglo-Irish colonists, constitute the second category. The trials of native Irishmen who fell victim to the sort of propaganda that justified the twelfth-century invasion and subsequent colonization of Ireland make up the third. Callan contends that Ireland’s trials resulted more from feuds than doctrinal deviance and reveal the range of relations between the English, the Irish, and the Anglo-Irish, and the church’s role in these relations; tensions within ecclesiastical hierarchy and between secular and spiritual authority; Ireland’s position within its broader European context; and political, cultural, ethnic, and gender concerns in the colony.

The Wild Irish Boy

In Three Volumes

The Wild Irish Boy


Wild Food

Proceedings of the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery, 2004

Wild Food

The 2004 Symposium on Wild Food: Hunters and Gatherers received a large number of excellent papers.