Seeds of Adventure

In Search of Plants

Seeds of Adventure

An extensive series of plant-exploring trips to the mountain areas of Asia.

The Fundamentals of Horticulture

Theory and Practice

The Fundamentals of Horticulture

Essential reading for all studying horticulture and keen gardeners. This clear introduction to the principles underlying the practical applications of horticulture opens up the excitement of growing plants and garden development, without readers having to wade through complex information. Full-colour images tied closely to the text and practical case study boxes inspire readers by making topics relevant to their own horticultural experiences. Written by a team of highly motivated and experienced horticultural tutors, the text supports the newly restructured RHS Level 2 qualifications, with related Level 3 topics in boxes and signposting to Level 4 topics, together with other horticultural qualifications at these levels.

The Plant Messiah

Adventures in Search of the World's Rarest Species

The Plant Messiah

Carlos Magdalena is a man on a mission: to save the world’s most endangered plants. In The Plant Messiah, Magdalena takes readers from the forests of Peru to deep within the Australian outback in search of the rare and the vulnerable. Back in the lab—at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, home of the largest botanical collection in the world—we watch as he develops groundbreaking, left-field techniques for rescuing species from extinction, encouraging them to propagate and thrive once again. Passionate and absorbing, The Plant Messiah is a tribute to the diversity of life on our planet, and to the importance of preserving it.

A Plantsman in Nepal

A Plantsman in Nepal

In 1971 a five man expedition journeyed through north-east Nepal in search of seed and plants. For over three months the team travelled with its Sherpa cooks, guides and porters in the rarefied air of the High Himalaya, at that time little explored, and some of the world's highest peaks - Mt. Everest, Makalu and Kangchenjunga - became part of everyday scenery as they marched north towards the border with Tibet. Camping each night on a high pasture, in a ravine, bog or forest, the team discovered an array of interesting and wonderful plants and made over 400 seed collections. Many of the expedition's finds described are familiar in gardens in the west; many are less well known, but in both cases the author describes their garden potential and performance, often comparing a plant found in the wild, with the same species grown in cultivation. In many cases he discusses the history of the plants, and the plantsmen of old who first introduced them. As with his previous magnum opus, Travels in China - A Plantsman's Paradise, Roy Lancaster's powers of observation are not restricted to plants and trees; he also describes with great vigour the team's many adventures, the hilarious parties with Tibetan villagers, the birds and animals encountered, the difficulties and delights of employing and travelling with the guides and porters, as well as the resourcefulness, hospitality, charm and day-to-day life of the Nepalese. The account of the expedition was first published in 1981 and this much enlarged new edition, together with updated nomenclature and an additional chapter on a subsequent visit to Nepal by the author, is accompanied by some 270 colour and 70 black and white illustrations, the vast majority taken by the author himself. It will be irresistible to all gardeners and plant lovers, whether of the armchair or active variety, and a constant source of reference for students, plant explorers and plant historians.

The Tiny Seed

The Tiny Seed

A skill-building edition of the classic story about the life cycle of a flower is told through the adventures of a tiny seed that floats across the sky, nestles in the ground and grows into the giant flower it was always meant to be. Simultaneous.

The Plant Hunters

The Adventures of the World's Greatest Botanical Explorers

The Plant Hunters

From geraniums to begonias, the common plants that often adorn backyard gardens are rarely native to our region. The same goes for many of the diverse and delicious fruits and vegetables that grace our dinner tables. We take their accessibility and ubiquity for granted, unaware of the great debt we owe to the naturalists and explorers who traveled around the world in search of these then unusual plants and brought back samples and seeds--along with fantastic stories. In The Plant Hunters, Carolyn Fry pays homage to those whose obsession with plants gave rise to our own passion for botanicals and gardening. Lavishly illustrated with more than one hundred images from the archives at the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, The Plant Hunters offers an accessible history of plant exploration and discovery through short, informative entries. From the naturalists of Alexander the Great's entourage to pioneering botanists such as Joseph Hooker, Joseph Banks, and Alexander von Humboldt, Fry's history covers the globe in its celebration of our fascination with plants. She shows how coconut trees and numerous fruits and vegetables were spread from one country to many, and the significant role that newly discovered plants, including tulips, tea, and rubber, have played in economic history. The Plant Hunters also traces the establishment of botanical gardens and the many uses of plants in medicine. In addition to stunning botanical drawings, the book features several unique facsimiles, including a letter from Carl Linnaeus, the father of taxonomy; extracts from Joseph Hooker's notebooks; an extract from the orchid sketchbook of John Day; and an original map of Kew Gardens made in 1740 by Jean Rocque. This gorgeous and entertaining history will be a perfect gift for gardeners, and anyone fascinated by the intersection of the histories of science and discovery.

Adventures in Edible Plant Foraging

Finding, Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Native and Invasive Wild Plants

Adventures in Edible Plant Foraging

Purchasing vegetables and leafy greens can become rather pricy. Moreover store-bought greens often contain unhealthy pesticides and chemicals that can be harmful to your health. Foraging for wild plants is a cost effective and healthy alternative. Harvested wild plants are cheaper, and much healthier with a significantly higher nutritional value than what you typically purchase in grocery stores contain. On top of that, harvesting your own plants will force you to get out, exercise, and explore the great outdoors, which is an excellent way to stay fit and spend time with your family. Written with novice foragers in mind, Adventures in Edible Plant Foraging, serves as a simplified guide to edible plants that can be found throughout North America, and includes a glossary of botanical terms. This all encompassing guide will teach you how to prepare for your first foray into foraging—what to bring and what to watch out for—and show you how to identify various edible wild plants native to your own backyard, the forest, fields and the sandy shores along lakes and beaches. With over 90 full color photographs and 20 recipes for soups, salads, muffins, desserts, and more, this book is a must have for anyone looking to save money and begin their first expedition into foraging.

Queen of Science

Personal Recollections of Mary Somerville

Queen of Science

The complete memoirs of the 19th century scientist, public intellectual, and first female member of the Royal Astronomical Society. Born in Jedburgh in 1780, Mary Fairfax was the daughter of a captain in Lord Nelson’s navy. In common with most girls of her time and station, she received an education that prized gentility over ability. Nevertheless, she taught herself algebra in secret, and made her reputation in celestial mechanics with her 1831 translation of Laplace’s Mécanique céleste as The Mechanism of the Heavens. A brilliant polymath with interests in art, literature and nature, Somerville’s memoirs give a fascinating picture of her life and times from childhood in Burntisland to international recognition and retirement in Naples. She recounts memories of comets and eclipses, high society in London and Paris, Charles Babbage and his calculating engine, encounters with Sir Walter Scott and Fenimore Cooper, the Risorgimento in Italy and the eruption of Vesuvius. Selected by her daughter and first published in 1973, these are the memoirs of a remarkable woman who became one of the nineteenth century’s most accomplished mathematicians and scientists. Oxford’s Somerville College was named after her, and the present volume, re-edited by Dorothy McMillan, draws on manuscripts owned by the college, offering the first unexpurgated edition of these revelatory writings.

Plants

Food, Medicine, and the Green Earth

Plants

Explores the research conducted by philosophers, botanists, and scientists over centuries that resulted in the emergent fields of botany, plant sociology, ecology, and biodiversity.