It's OK That You're Not OK

Meeting Grief and Loss in a Culture That Doesn't Understand

It's OK That You're Not OK

Challenging conventional wisdom on grief, a pioneering therapist offers a new resource for those experiencing loss When a painful loss or life-shattering event upends your world, here is the first thing to know: there is nothing wrong with grief. “Grief is simply love in its most wild and painful form,” says Megan Devine. “It is a natural and sane response to loss.” So, why does our culture treat grief like a disease to be cured as quickly as possible? In It’s OK That You’re Not OK, Megan Devine offers a profound new approach to both the experience of grief and the way we try to help others who have endured tragedy. Having experienced grief from both sides—as both a therapist and as a woman who witnessed the accidental drowning of her beloved partner—Megan writes with deep insight about the unspoken truths of loss, love, and healing. She debunks the culturally prescribed goal of returning to a normal, “happy” life, replacing it with a far healthier middle path, one that invites us to build a life alongside grief rather than seeking to overcome it. In this compelling and heartful book, you’ll learn: • Why well-meaning advice, therapy, and spiritual wisdom so often end up making it harder for people in grief • How challenging the myths of grief—doing away with stages, timetables, and unrealistic ideals about how grief should unfold—allows us to accept grief as a mystery to be honored instead of a problem to solve • Practical guidance for managing stress, improving sleep, and decreasing anxiety without trying to “fix” your pain • How to help the people you love—with essays to teach us the best skills, checklists, and suggestions for supporting and comforting others through the grieving process Many people who have suffered a loss feel judged, dismissed, and misunderstood by a culture that wants to “solve” grief. Megan writes, “Grief no more needs a solution than love needs a solution.” Through stories, research, life tips, and creative and mindfulness-based practices, she offers a unique guide through an experience we all must face—in our personal lives, in the lives of those we love, and in the wider world. It’s OK That You’re Not OK is a book for grieving people, those who love them, and all those seeking to love themselves—and each other—better.

It's Ok That You're Not Ok

Perfect Notebook Gift for Your Family Women Men Wife, Girlfriend Boyfriend Coworker

It's Ok That You're Not Ok

perfect notebook gift for your family women men wife, girlfriend boyfriend coworker, 120 pages lined blank .

You Can Be Happy Again

Breakthrough Tips from a Life Coach

You Can Be Happy Again

Do You Want to be Happy Again? Are you stuck in life? What’s keeping you from moving forward? Do you want to be from fear, unforgiveness and misery? This book will help you be happy again. The tips in this book can free you from the chains that are holding you back from living your best life. Break free from the negative feelings and limiting beliefs that you may have unconsciously placed on yourself. Learn how to throw your excess baggage away and read about life-changing tools that will help heal your mind, heart and spirit. Get out of your pain zone and take the necessary steps towards change. Yes, you can be happy again. You can be free to be the best that you can be!

Permission to Grieve

Creating Grace, Space, & Room to Breathe in the Aftermath of Loss

Permission to Grieve

The voice behind the popular grief podcast Coming Back: Conversations on Life After Loss puts pen to paper in her first book to create a powerful permission slip for anyone facing the devastating heartbreak that comes with death, divorce, diagnosis, and so much more. When loss steamrolls through, there’s a lot of hidden and not-so-hidden “rules” about the way you’re “supposed” to grieve: “You should be over it after a year.” “Put on a brave face.” “Keep your grief at home.” Permission to Grieve calls out society’s garbage rules for what they really are: toxic and repressive narratives that insist we abandon our true selves in the face of grief. Shelby asks instead: - What if we allowed grief the freedom to influence our emotions? - What if we allowed grief the power to alter our identities at home, school, and work? - What if we allowed grief to show up in the physical world through art, memorial, and ritual? - What if we gave ourselves… Permission to Grieve? Drawing on her experience as a grieving person and two years’ worth of interviews with grief experts like Megan Devine, Kerry Egan, and Caleb Wilde, Shelby Forsythia makes the case for radical, self-honoring permission—free from personal judgement and society’s restrictive timelines and rules. Permission to Grieve guides you to call your grief out of hiding and invites you to give it permission through thoughtful writing prompts, easy-to-follow exercises, and clever visual illustrations. In this book you’ll learn: - How society encourages us to practice life-rejection and self-abandonment instead of expressing our grief - The three big permissions that unlock the emotions, identities, and actions our grief wants to express—featuring insights from -podcast guests and Shelby Forsythia’s personal grief community - Tips and tricks for practicing permission to grieve in the real world—including how to ask for permission to grieve from friends, family, and coworkers and tools for helping others tap into their own permission to grieve Permission to Grieve is not a hall pass from a higher authority; it’s a personal practice that is strengthened with self-awareness, attention, and love. You don’t have to wait to receive permission to grieve; you already have it. Permission to Grieve is a book for people who are tired of covering up and pushing down their pain. It’s a book for people who know that there’s a better, more compassionate way to approach the worst thing that has ever happened to them. It’s a book for people who believe that grief is not an enemy to be vanquished as quickly as possible, but an opportunity to connect more deeply with their human selves. Because even in the midst of loss, Shelby writes, we can create grace, space, and room to breathe.

It's OK to Feel Things Deeply

It's OK to Feel Things Deeply

This book is like a hug from a friend when you need it most: It's both a reminder that it's normal to feel things deeply and a companion for actually feeling better. With tons of empathy and a touch of humor, artist Carissa Potter offers wisdom on how to move through difficult emotions with practical steps to kick-start the process—ranging from soaking in a tub and having a good cry to talking to houseplants or hosting a private dance party. Illustrated in a vibrant eye-catching palette, this boldly authentic book is full of genuine support for pushing through life's tough times or whenever a little love is needed.

Enough

How I Forgave the Drunk Driver who Nearly Killed my Baby and Me

Enough

I nearly lost my baby…and myself. What if a stranger’s actions permanently scarred your life? Could you forgive? For Lindsay Manning, that moment happened when she was nine-months pregnant, just days before her due date. A drunk driver going the wrong way smashed into her car head-on, leaving her suddenly unable to feel her baby moving inside. Both she and baby Adler survived, but not without life-threatening complications. What Manning didn’t expect was that most of her suffering happened after everyone came home healthy. She fought medical, emotional, financial, marital, social, legal, spiritual turbulence. When circumstances seemingly settled around her, she was still bleeding and screaming inside. In Enough, Manning takes the reader through her heart-wrenching story, enduring agony, grief, PTSD, loneliness, fury, courage, tenacity, then eventually peace through forgiveness. One drunk driver made decisions that drastically altered Manning’s life story, but through tears and tenacity, she fights to claim her “sparkle” back.

It's OK to Go Up the Slide

Renegade Rules for Raising Confident and Creative Kids

It's OK to Go Up the Slide

When it comes to parenting, sometimes you have to trust your gut. With her first book, It’s OK Not to Share, Heather Shumaker overturned all the conventional rules of parenting with her “renegade rules” for raising competent and compassionate kids. In It’s Ok To Go Up the Slide, Shumaker takes on new hot-button issues with renegade rules such as: - Recess Is A Right - It’s Ok Not To Kiss Grandma - Ban Homework in Elementary School - Safety Second - Don’t Force Participation Shumaker also offers broader guidance on how parents can control their own fears and move from an overscheduled life to one of more free play. Parenting can too often be reduced to shuttling kids between enrichment classes, but Shumaker challenges parents to reevaluate how they’re spending their precious family time. This book helps parents help their kids develop important life skills in an age-appropriate way. Most important, parents must model these skills, whether it’s technology use, confronting conflict, or coping emotionally with setbacks. Sometimes being a good parent means breaking all the rules. From the Trade Paperback edition.

How to Carry What Can't Be Fixed

A Journal for Grief

How to Carry What Can't Be Fixed

A journal for meeting grief with honesty and kindness—honoring loss, rather than packing it away With her breakout book It’s OK That You’re Not OK, Megan Devine struck a chord with thousands of readers through her honest, validating approach to grief. In her same direct, no-platitudes style, she now offers How to Carry What Can’t Be Fixed—a journal filled with unique, creative ways to open a dialogue with grief itself. “Being allowed to tell the truth about your grief is an incredibly powerful act,” she says, “This journal enables you to tell your whole story, without the need to tack on a happy ending where there isn’t one.” Grief is a natural response to death and loss—it’s not a problem to be fixed. This workbook contains no clichés, timetables, or checklists of stages to get through; it won’t help you “move on” or put your loss behind you. Instead, you’ll find encouragement, self-care exercises, daily tools, tear-and-share resources to help you educate friends and allies, and prompts to help you honor your pain and heartbreak. “Your grief has an intelligence of its own,” Devine writes. “Let it tell you what it knows.” With How to Carry What Can’t Be Fixed, this pioneering author brings you an essential resource to help you enter a conversation with your grief, find your own truth, and live into the life you didn’t ask for—but is here nonetheless.

Teachings on Being

Teachings on Being

A quintessential religious text, these original teachings are the fruit of millennia of religious thought. They will surely provide valuable insight for the spiritual beings of believers and non-believers alike. Codrin Tapu is a pioneer that generations will follow. -Dr. Lisa Christiansen