It's Not Ok to Feel Blue (and Other Lies): Inspirational People Open Upabout Their Mental Health

It's Not Ok to Feel Blue (and Other Lies): Inspirational People Open Upabout Their Mental Health

Last year, Scarlett Curtis and 52 inspirational women wrote an extraordinary anthology on what feminism means to them. The book went on to be a cultural phenomenon and turned the world Pink. This year, it's Blue. We are living in the middle of a mental health epidemic and we have a choice- we can be floored by it - or we can start to make a difference. Here are the extraordinary people making that difference. Other People Don't Feel Blue (and other lies) is a collection of words from those who have suffered through the worst, and know what it's like to fight to feel better. This isn't just a book. It's a shout, a scream that cuts above the noise and lets everyone know they are not alone. Funny, sad, clever, relatable it will be a shining example of the power of words to make us all feel better.

It's Not OK to Feel Blue (and other lies)

Inspirational people open up about their mental health

It's Not OK to Feel Blue (and other lies)

*The Sunday Times bestseller* 'Reading this book made me feel more normal about the things I feel sometimes... It's a great book; however you're feeling, it'll help' - Ed Sheeran It's OK if everything might feel a bit overwhelming. It's OK to talk about it. It's OK to not want to talk about it. It's OK to find it funny. It's OK to be human. Over 70 people have shared their powerful, funny and moving stories exploring their own mental health, including Sam Smith, Emilia Clarke, Candice Carty-Williams and Adam Kay. One in four of us will experience a mental health issue. This book is here to tell you, or someone you care about, it's OK. With writing from: Adam Kay - Alastair Campbell - Alexis Caught - Ben Platt - Bryony Gordon - Candice Carty-Williams - Charlie Mackesy - Charly Cox - Chidera Eggerue - Claire Stancliffe - Davina McCall - Dawn O'Porter - Elizabeth Day - Elizabeth Uviebinené - Ella Purnell - Emilia Clarke - Emma Thompson - Eve Delaney - Fearne Cotton - Gabby Edlin - Gemma Styles - GIRLI (Milly Toomey) - Grace Beverley - Hannah Witton - Honey Ross - Hussain Manawer - Jack Rooke - James Blake - Jamie Flook - Jamie Windust - Jessie Cave - Jo Irwin - Jonah Freud - Jonny Benjamin - Jordan Stephens - Kai-Isaiah Jamal - Kate Weinberg - Kelechi Okafor - Khalil Aldabbas - KUCHENGA - Lauren Mahon - Lena Dunham - Maggie Matic - Martha Lane Fox - Mathew Kollamkulam - Matt Haig - Megan Crabbe - Michael Kitching - Michelle Elman - Miranda Hart - Mitch Price - Mona Chalabi - Montana Brown - Nadia Craddock - Naomi Campbell - Poorna Bell - Poppy Jamie - Reggie Yates - Ripley Parker - Robert Kazandjian - Rosa Mercuriadis - Saba Asif - Sam Smith - Scarlett Curtis - Scarlett Moffatt - Scottee - Sharon Chalkin Feldstein - Shonagh Marie - Simon Amstell - Steve Ali - Tanya Byron - Travon Free - Yomi Adegoke - Yusuf Al Majarhi 'This is the freshest, most honest collection of writings about mental health that I've read... searing wit, blinding passion, bleeding emotion and a fantastic, heroic, glorious refusal to lie down and take it' - Stephen Fry 'This is the book I needed when I was little. May this be a leap forward in the much needed conversation around mental health' - Jameela Jamil

How to Go to Work

The Honest Advice No One Ever Tells You at the Start of Your Career

How to Go to Work

How to go to Work is a practical guide to equip you with everything you need to know to choose and achieve the career you want. The world of work is changing faster than ever before and it can feel overwhelmingly competitive out there. That's why Lucy Clayton, a founding CEO, and Steve Haines, an education policy advisor, have compiled and distilled the most valuable advice you can get on how to jumpstart your career and shortcut the competition. They have interviewed successful people from across all industries to help you: -Find the right work experience and internships to get you through the door -Present your best self online and in person -Ace applications and interviews -Gain confidence, authority and resilience -Navigate the ups and downs of starting your first job How to go to Work will equip you with the skills you need to thrive in whatever job or career you choose.

It's OK to Go Up the Slide

Renegade Rules for Raising Confident and Creative Kids

It's OK to Go Up the Slide

When it comes to parenting, sometimes you have to trust your gut. With her first book, It’s OK Not to Share, Heather Shumaker overturned all the conventional rules of parenting with her “renegade rules” for raising competent and compassionate kids. In It’s Ok To Go Up the Slide, Shumaker takes on new hot-button issues with renegade rules such as: - Recess Is A Right - It’s Ok Not To Kiss Grandma - Ban Homework in Elementary School - Safety Second - Don’t Force Participation Shumaker also offers broader guidance on how parents can control their own fears and move from an overscheduled life to one of more free play. Parenting can too often be reduced to shuttling kids between enrichment classes, but Shumaker challenges parents to reevaluate how they’re spending their precious family time. This book helps parents help their kids develop important life skills in an age-appropriate way. Most important, parents must model these skills, whether it’s technology use, confronting conflict, or coping emotionally with setbacks. Sometimes being a good parent means breaking all the rules. From the Trade Paperback edition.

My Name is Not Easy

My Name is Not Easy

Alaskans Luke, Chickie, Sonny, Donna, and Amiq relate their experiences in the early 1960s when they are forced to attend a Catholic boarding school where, despite different tribal affiliations, they come to find a sort of family and home.

The Lamentations of Julius Marantz

The Lamentations of Julius Marantz

Who would benefit if they really did bring The Rapture on? Marc Estrin follows another of his strange protagonists through a world troubled by what it knows and by how it applies that knowledge. From the first page, we are plunged into a global riot of paranoia, joy, and fear. But something is sadly familiar here, perhaps because we have been taught to anticipate a world in which people suddenly fly off the planet. It might be The Rapture. Or it might be some violation of the force of gravity. Whatever it is, it’s spreading madness, religious hysteria, and some truly formidable government powers. The voice of these Lamentations is a sixty-something, club-footed scientist named Julius Marantz, an obsessive researcher who suffers both from forbidden knowledge and an insistent conscience. As his spirit and his heart begin to fail, Julius realizes what is lost to him: a childhood of possibility, the consolation of belief, and the undying optimism of a father who taught him the principles of physics on the roller-coaster and the parachute jump. Partly a portrait of cynical politics and religious fervor, part scientific speculation and even a meditation on the glories of Coney Island, The Lamentations of Julius Marantz traces the rise and fall of science in a truly personal story that finally fairly ascends.

Love and Freedom

Love and Freedom

New start, new love. That’s what Honor Sontag needs after her life falls apart, leaving her reputation in tatters and her head all over the place. So she flees her native America and heads for Brighton, England. Honor’s hoping for a much-deserved break and the chance to find the mother who abandoned her as a baby. What she gets is an entanglement with a mysterious male whose family seems to have a finger in every pot in town. Martyn Mayfair has sworn off women with strings attached, but is irresistibly drawn to Honor, the American who keeps popping up in his life. All he wants is an uncomplicated relationship built on honesty, but Honor’s past threatens to undermine everything. Then secrets about her mother start to spill out ... Honor has to make an agonising choice. Will she live up to her dutiful name and please others? Or will she choose freedom?

The Other Side of 50

The Other Side of 50

This manuscript that you are reading is not a book in the traditional sense of the word. It is rather a compilation of thoughts and experiences I have had and various treatises that I have felt compelled to write over the last few years. It is because of my desire to share these observations that I have decided to put them together. They all served to codify my thoughts and feelings and convey what I personally believe in areas of health of body, mind and spirit. Because some of these articles were written at different times, you may find certain truths repeated from time to time. Please forgive this and edit them out; it is my feeling that they serve to reinforce that which has helped me to arrive happily at three score and ten. I still refer back to this book as a resource and find its validity for me to be sustaining. If it helps you to have at least one happier day, it will have fulfilled its purpose.

Blue Roses

Blue Roses

How could something which seemed so right turn out so bad? Based on a true story This story is written from the context of the fly on the wall. This is the story before the spin doctors and the layers laid hold upon it. This has happened in your community or it is yet to occur. This story is about people (Both good and bad) who are caught up in the world of the corrupt and powerful. Amongst the glitter and glamour is darkness lurking in the background. Perhaps the darkness behind it makes it glitter all the more. Even the delivery of a beautiful bouquet of roses could have an ulterior motive or dark agenda behind it. Sometimes bad things happen to good people. Despite our best efforts sometimes tragedy happens anyway.

Tales of a Female Nomad

Living at Large in the World

Tales of a Female Nomad

The true story of an ordinary woman living an extraordinary existence all over the world. “Gelman doesn’t just observe the cultures she visits, she participates in them, becoming emotionally involved in the people’s lives. This is an amazing travelogue.” —Booklist At the age of forty-eight, on the verge of a divorce, Rita Golden Gelman left an elegant life in L.A. to follow her dream of travelling the world, connecting with people in cultures all over the globe. In 1986, Rita sold her possessions and became a nomad, living in a Zapotec village in Mexico, sleeping with sea lions on the Galapagos Islands, and residing everywhere from thatched huts to regal palaces. She has observed orangutans in the rain forest of Borneo, visited trance healers and dens of black magic, and cooked with women on fires all over the world. Rita’s example encourages us all to dust off our dreams and rediscover the joy, the exuberance, and the hidden spirit that so many of us bury when we become adults.